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Curtin University
Staff Profile

Associate Professor Xuan-Ce Wang

Associate Professor Xuan-Ce Wang Associate Professor Xuan-Ce Wang

BSc(China Univ Geosci), PhD(Guangzhou Inst Geochem)

Position Associate Professor
Faculty Faculty of Science and Engineering
School Western Australian School of Mines
Department Department of Applied Geology
Campus Bentley Campus
Location 314.Room 164
Phone +61 8 9266 4125
Fax +61 8 9266 3153
Email X.Wang3@curtin.edu.au
Website www.researchgate.net/profile/Xuan-Ce_Wang
ORCID orcid.org/0000-0001-7276-6273
ResearcherID www.researcherid.com/rid/F-1516-2010
Google Scholar scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=1n1yk1IAAAAJ&hl=en
Scopus Author Identifier www.scopus.com/authid/detail.url?authorId=35241368200

Brief Summary

Wang received his Bachelor of Science in geology and Master of Science in Geochemistry from China University of Geosciences in 2001 and 2004, respectively and a PhD on geochemistry and petrology in 2008 from the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Science. In 2008, he joined the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, in Beijing, as a postdoctoral fellow and moved to Curtin in 2009. He was awarded an ARC Future fellowship in 2014.

Adjunct Professorships at Chang’an University (2015-present) and Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry (2015-present)

Adjunct Seiner Research Fellow at The University of Queensland, Australia.

Overview

Wang uses isotope and major and trace element geochemistry, petrology, field geology and simple geodynamic models to investigate the origin and evolution of the Earth’s crust and mantle, with particular emphasis on the relationships between intra-continental geotectonic phenomena, plate tectonics, and mantle plumes and the roles of plume and deep-Earth fluid cycling in the breakup of supercontinents. His current research focuses on understanding

His current ARC Future fellowship project aims to test a provocative and potentially ground-breaking hypothesis that deep-Earth fluid cycling may

  1. trigger/control large-scale eruptions of intra-continental basalts,
  2. leave subduction-like geochemical fingerprints in continental flood basalts (CFBs) that are far away from plate boundaries,
  3. potentially result in de-stabilisation of old cratonic roots,
  4. affect/control the long-term climate evolution.

The outcomes will fill the knowledge gap of how fluids work in the geodynamic system, and will help us to understand how geodynamic processes influence paleoclimate changes.

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Memberships, Awards and Training

2014 ARC Future fellowship

2014 Awarded for highest research performance index in Curtin University and in Faculty

2008 Awarded President's Scholarship from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

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Employment History

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY:

2015-present, ARC Future fellow, Curtin University

Oct, 2011-204, Senior Research Fellow, ARC Centre of Excellence in Core to Crust Fluid Systems and Curtin University;

Oct, 2009-Oct, 2010, Senior Research Fellow, Curtin University jointly funded with UWA;

March, 2008- Oct, 2009, Post-Doctoral Fellow at Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China;

Oct, 2004-May, 2008, Research Assistant: Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (supervisor, Professor Xian-Hua Li);

July, 2001-10, 2004, Research Assistant:  Earth Science School, China University of Geoscience (Wuhan) (Supervisor, Professor Shan Gao).

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Research Interests

Origin and evolution of the Earth’s crust and mantle: I use isotope and major and trace element geochemistry, petrology, field geology and simple geodynamic models to investigate the origin and evolution of the Earth’s crust and mantle, with particular emphasis on the relationships between intra-continental geotectonic phenomena, plate tectonics, and mantle plumes and the roles of plume and deep-Earth fluid cycling in the breakup of supercontinents. This research has been published in prestigious international journals including Nature, Geology, Journal of Petrology, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, GSA Bulletin, and Lithos.

 Deciphering early Earth processes and subsequent mantle evolution using komatiites and associated rocks: The main goal of this study is to use a combination of Archean komatiite and associated rocks to decipher early Earth processes. This will include metal-silicate segregation and late accretion, to crystallization of a magma ocean or formation of a proto- crust and to examine the role played by early chemical heterogeneity in shaping Earth’s subsequent chemical architecture and mantle evolution. The study will develop a new conceptual understanding of the processes and events that shaped the early Earth during its infancy. Knowledge obtained will link early global differentiation processes with subsequent mantle evolution, providing a fresh perspective on the evolution of the Earth system. This is crucial for understanding the formation and distribution of Earth rare metal resources during the Archean and determining chemical and petrological signatures favourable for komatiite hosted Cu-Ni-PGE-Au mineral deposition.

 Characterization and isotope dating of source rocks and hydrocarbon generation for exploration targeting: The primary aim of this study is to develop a multiple isotope approach for the direct dating of hydrocarbons and their source rocks and to establish new proxies for oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations in petroleum reservoirs. Application of this integrated, novel analytical protocol to Proterozoic and Palaeozoic sedimentary basins in Australia and China will increase the prospectively of shale oil and gas through improved exploration targeting. The main deliverable from this project will be new protocols and guidelines for end-users with wide application in conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon exploration, bringing long-term benefits and competitive advantages to Australia’s petroleum industry.

Roles of deep-Earth fluid cycling in the generation of intraplate magmatism: This study links fluid cycling, large-scale intra-continental magmatism, volcanic volatile flux, climate changes, mantle chemical geodynamics, plate tectonics, and slab stagnation in a self-consistent geodynamic system. This research will integrate geochemistry, petrology, geophysics, global tectonics, and thermodynamical modelling to reach a new level of understanding of the fluid cycling and Earth’s dynamics through time. The outcomes will fill the knowledge gap of how fluids work in the Earth’s system, and will help us to understand how deep-Earth’s geodynamic processes influence paleoclimate changes. This work will also help us to identify ways to improve future mineral exploration success. This research has been published in Nature communications (2015).The current research focuses on Tibet, Central Asian Orogenic Belt, and Ester China.

Deep Earth - atmosphere interactions and long-term climate evolution: I currently focus on interplays between magmatism, erosion, and chemical weathering, with implications for the lifespan of orogenic events, cycling of supercontinents, materials circulation between Earth surface and its interior, the nature of volcanism, the evolution of the sedimentary basin, and the climate record from polar ice and sedimentary rocks.

 

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Specialty Areas

Geochemistry,Petrology, and Environment Science.

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Publications

Featured Publications

Journal Articles (Research)

2016

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2015

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2014

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2013

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2012

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2011

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2010

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2009

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2008

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2006

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2005

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2004

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2003

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2000

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Additional publication categories

2016

Journal Articles (Scholarly/Professional)

  • Wu, J., Z. Li, and X. Wang. 2016.“Comment on “Behavior of Re and Os during contact between an aqueous solution and oil: Consequences for the application of the Re–Os geochronometer to petroleum” [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 158 (2015) 1–21].”Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta 186: 344-347.

2014

Journal Articles (Scholarly/Professional)

2010

Journal Articles (Scholarly/Professional)

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PhD scholarships available

The ARC Future fellowship to Xuan-Ce Wang (2014-2018) and Curtin-co-funding for the ARC Future Fellowship grant and several industry funded projects, provide two new PhD scholarships for up to four years to work in the following field. The students will join a team in a vibrant research environment at Curtin University's The Institute for Geoscience Research (TIGeR: http://tiger.curtin.edu.au), the Department of Applied Geology (http://scieng.curtin.edu.au/wa-school-of-mines/applied-geology/). Current core research staff in the team include Associate Professor Xuan-Ce Wang and Dr Zhen Li from Curtin, Professor Jian-Xin Zhao from UQ and Professors Wu-Xian Li and Chao-Feng Li from CAS.

  1. (a) Deep- Earth fluid cycling and evolution of Tibet plateau; or (b) Mantle recycling from the mantle transition zone to large-scale continental crustal magmatism (1 PhD position)

  2. Isotope dating and fingerprinting of hydrocarbons and their source rocks for petroleum exploration ((1 PhD position).

Contact:

Interested candidates are invited to contact Dr. Zhen Li at Zhen.Li@curtin.edu.au.

More details see: http://phdposition.com/positions/earth-science-phd-position

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