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Curtin University
Staff Profile

Dr Rajan Chhetri

Position Research Associate
Faculty Faculty of Science and Engineering
School School of Science
Department Department of Physics and Astronomy
Campus Technology Park
Location 610
Email Rajan.Chhetri@curtin.edu.au

Overview

I am very interested in the mysteries of the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies, called active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Why are some quiet and others active enough to produce largest scale independent objects in the universe? Do the quiet type live in the same host as the active type? How have they affected the environment around them, and, in turn, been affected by the environment? How can we best study them? These are some of the questions that keep me very occupied.

During my doctoral work, at the University of New South Wales and jointly at Australia Telescope National Facility, I worked in the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey and extended its angular resolution capability by about a hundred times. I have conducted a comprehensive search for gravitational lenses in the entire Southern hemisphere. I have studied compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high radio frequencies, up to 45 GHz, and conducted multi wavelength studies of compact AGNs and radio galaxies using other radio wavelengths, infrared, optical, X-ray and Gamma ray.

Currently, I am using the interplanetary scintillation method to identify compact components in the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data. This method uses the property of the interplanetary medium to scintillate very distant and compact objects (e.g. AGNs) in the lower radio frequencies (few hundred megahertz), which is very similar to the twinkling of the stars in the night sky due to atmospheric turbulence. This will allow us to identify about a thousand times smaller objects than possible now, without having to raise the instrumental capability of the MWA. This will allow us to study these very compact and interesting objects at lower radio frequencies and untangle some of the mysteries that currently enshroud them.

Research Interests

Active galactic nuclei
Populations of radio sources and their evolution
Multi wavelength studies of extragalactic populations

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Specialty Areas

Radio interferometry
Non-standard analysis of interferometric data
Public outreach
 

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Publications

2015

Journal Articles (Research)

2013

Journal Articles (Research)

2012

Journal Articles (Research)

2011

Journal Articles (Research)

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Publications

 

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