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Curtin University
Staff Profile

Associate Professor Gretchen Benedix

Associate Professor Gretchen Benedix Associate Professor Gretchen Benedix
Position Associate Professor
Faculty Faculty of Science and Engineering
School Western Australian School of Mines
Department Department of Applied Geology
Campus Bentley Campus
Email G.Benedix@curtin.edu.au

Brief Summary

Gretchen is a cosmic mineralogist / astro-geologist using the chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy and petrology of meteorites to understand the formation and evolution of asteroids and other planets.  She got her PhD at the University of Hawaii, Manoa in 1997, working on unraveling the geologic history of a rare group of meteorites that offer a snapshot into planetary differentiation processes.   After this, she held a number of post-doctoral positions that broadened her knowledge base, from determining the surface composition of Saturn's moons to looking at how water/ice interacts with silicates on small bodies.  She has worked at both the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and The Natural History Museum in London as a researcher.   She joined Curtin in 2012 as a Senior Lecturer.  She currently holds a Curtin Research Fellowship which runs to 2019.

Memberships, Awards and Training

Asteroid 6579 re-named Benedix in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union for contributions to planetary science

ESA ExoMars MARS-XRD instrument team member

Antarctic Service Medal of the National Science Foundation - she has participtated in two meteorite searching field trips in Antarctica

Member of:  Meteoritical Society (since 1994), American Geophysical Union (since 1994), National Association of Geoscience Teachers (since 1996), Mineralogical Society (since 2008), Geological Society of America (since 2015).  

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Teaching

GEOL2001 Structure, Mineralogy and Geochemistry (Unit Coordinator)

GEOL2003 Mineralogy and Geochemistry

GEOL2008 Field Geology Techniques

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Research Fields

Physical Sciences

Earth Sciences

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Research Interests

The evolution of the Solar System is complex due to the number of processes that affected the bodies that formed from the gas and dust of the solar nebula.  These processes include rapid (impact, shock waves, lightning) and slow (short-lived radionuclides, accretionary heat) heating events, mixing events, and cooling events, which may or may not occur in the presence of water (most likely in the form of ice, rather than liquid).   Exploring how these processes occur is important in order to understand the nature of planet formation in our own Solar System.  

Gretchen has a range of interests and strengths within planetary science, broadly concerned with the early evolution of the solar system, including: incipient melting, differentiation and core formation of protoplanets; oxidation state of the solar nebula; thermal and aqueous processes in asteroids; and surface evolution of Mars through solar system history.

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Publications

2017

Journal Articles (Research)

2016

Journal Articles (Research)

2015

Journal Articles (Research)

2014

Journal Articles (Research)

Conference Articles (Research)

2013

Book Chapters (Research)

Journal Articles (Research)

2012

Journal Articles (Research)

2011

Journal Articles (Research)

2010

Journal Articles (Research)

2009

Journal Articles (Research)

2008

Journal Articles (Research)

2007

Journal Articles (Research)

2006

Journal Articles (Research)

2005

Journal Articles (Research)

2004

Journal Articles (Research)

2003

Journal Articles (Research)

2002

Journal Articles (Research)

2000

Journal Articles (Research)

1999

Journal Articles (Research)

1998

Journal Articles (Research)

1996

Journal Articles (Research)

1995

Journal Articles (Research)

Additional publication categories

2015

Journal Articles (Scholarly/Professional)

2011

Book Chapters - Other

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